More Vintage X-Ray Fetishism

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We can’t just get enough of those Naughty, Naughty Roentgen Rays. The above commercial, from 1930s Germany, nicely illustrates the fears (and titillation) surrounding Dr. Roentgen’s invention, then goes on to assure the modern woman that rumors of “Roentgetn glasses,” been true, she would be well served by the elegance of contemporary Felina lingerie.

And these fears were real enough to sustain a brief market in anti-voyeueristic dress manufacture as evidenced by this ad from 1896 for “the perfect dress interlining.”

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The seamy peekaboo undercurrents associated with the medical marvel are likewise nicely evoked by this photo found on one of our favorite Tumblr blogs, Sutured Infection.

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And from the blog Glamor Daze we some American footage from the 1940s that reminds us of that X-rays had much to recommend them to foot fetishists too who might have enjoyed hanging around shoe stores where X-ray scanners were kept around to aid in fitting and attract curious  consumers.

Finally, a bit of verse, also penned by Lawrence K. Russel and published by Life Magazine in 1896:

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She is so tall, so slender; and her bones– Those frail phosphates, those carbonates of lime– Are well produced by cathode rays sublime; By oscillations, amperes and by ohms, Her dorsal vertebrae are no concealed By epidermis, but are well revealed.

Around her ribs, those beauteous twenty-four, Her flesh a halo makes, misty in lime, Her noseless, eyeless face looks into mine, And I but whisper, “Sweetheart, je t’adore.” Her white and gleaming teeth at me do laugh, Ah! lovely, cruel, sweet cathodagraph!

Art of Bleeding Show Announced

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If you’re in San Francisco, September 30, you’ll have the chance to witness The Art of Bleeding stage something akin to our 2006 Halloween Car Crash show shown here. The event will celebrate the publication of The Book of the Is by punk-rock impresario, prankster, mayoral candidate, and man-about-town Chicken John.  AoB will perform alongside the daredevils of of Cyclecide’s Bike Rodeo and other acts TBA at  at 111 Minna Gallery, (or rather on the street outside the gallery!)

 

Masaru Shichinohe’s Magic Nurse

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We don’t know much about Masaru Shichinohe, but we know what we like, and we like the not-entirely-innocent magic of these dreamlike scenes of children playing doctor. His site is in Japanese, so all we can say is that he was born in 1959 and has 18 books published, none of which have yet been translated into English.  Linguists and publishers take note!

You can find more of these images here and on the artist’s website.

 

Reserve Your Copy: Empire of Death

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(photos from Empire de la Mort.)

Usually we try to reign in our morbid interests right at the point where life ends and death begins, but in this case, we make an exception for  our friend artist, photographer, writer Paul Koudounaris. After years of travel and photography, Koudounaris has produced the exquisitely illustrated and painstakingly researched The Empire of Death: A Cultural History of Ossuaries and Charnel Houses now available  for pre-order from Amazon.   Here is the description from the site:

From bone fetishism in the ancient world to the painted skulls of Salzburg: an unusual and compelling work of cultural history.

It is sometimes said that death is the last taboo, but it was not always so. For centuries, religious establishments constructed decorated ossuaries and charnel houses that stand as masterpieces of art created from human bone. These unique structures have been pushed into the footnotes of history; they were part of a dialogue with death that is now silent.

The sites in this specially photographed and brilliantly original study range from the Monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Palermo, where the living would visit mummified or skeletal remains and lovingly dress them; to the Paris catacombs; to fantastic bone-encrusted creations in Austria, Cambodia, the Czech Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, Greece, Italy, Peru, Portugal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and elsewhere.

Paul Koudounaris photographed more than seventy sites for this book. He analyzes the role of these remarkable memorials within the cultures that created them, as well as the mythology and folklore that developed around them, and skillfully traces a remarkable human endeavor. 250 full-color and 50 black-and-white photographs.

Koudounaris has also launched the supplemental site Empire de la Mort where a rich foretaste of the publication’s wonders are available.

Video Release Monday. A Few Stills

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If you’ve noticed a recent drop in the number of postings on this blog, it’s because I’ve been in a dark cave animating the next Art of Bleeding video the last couple months.  Promise to get back to more regular posts, and on Monday will be posting the video.  Please check back here or  our YouTube page.   It will make you feel funny, yes it will.

The Anatomical Art of Fernando Vicente

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Spanish illustrator and artist Fernando Vicente merges photography and painting in his illustrations for magazines, books, CDs, and film posters, but may be most well known in this country for his anatomically themed “Vanitas” and “Anatomias” painting series — the former dissecting the fashion world with a rather literal touch and the latter taking a similarly literal approach to the machine/body analogy.