Category Archives: retro

Drug Education for Cats

http://youtu.be/PeFY2-KtD0w

Much like a baby’s skull, The Art of Bleeding has a soft spot — spot in question being a fondness for of old safety educational films.  Above is a prime parodic example in which catnip tidily substitutes for the bogeyman LSD.  Odd fact: creator  Jason Willis is actually one of the kids in the “Halloween Safety” film we remixed a couple years back.  His recollections of that experience make for an interesting read.

 

Rx: Kitsch with Bob Byerley

Googling for “Medical Paintings” the other day turned up these kitschy wonders painted by artist Bob Byerley.

Aside from a colossal sentimentality that makes Norman Rockwell look like George Grosz, Byerley’s undeniable technical skills have helped make his paintings a hot Red State commodity.  Taking a cue, no doubt, from fellow conservative artist/entrepreneur Thomas Kinkade self-styled “Painter of Light,” Byerley bills himself as “The Painter of Our American Childhood,” stressing his heartland cred by pointing to a childhood spent in Kansas City, the propagandistic extremes of this opium dream of an Americana childhood can probably be explained by the fact that the artist only began painting toward the end of the 1960s.

Still, there’s something to love in his depiction of those  low-budget homemade medical props these kids have so ambitiously thrown together.  Can’t help but remind us of an Art of Bleeding show.

Or with a little help from psychedelics maybe this painting, Alice in Nukeland by Alejandro Dini. (thanks LaughingSquid.)

More Vintage X-Ray Fetishism

http://youtu.be/xLg_3XyXAyc

We can’t just get enough of those Naughty, Naughty Roentgen Rays. The above commercial, from 1930s Germany, nicely illustrates the fears (and titillation) surrounding Dr. Roentgen’s invention, then goes on to assure the modern woman that rumors of “Roentgetn glasses,” been true, she would be well served by the elegance of contemporary Felina lingerie.

And these fears were real enough to sustain a brief market in anti-voyeueristic dress manufacture as evidenced by this ad from 1896 for “the perfect dress interlining.”

perfect_dress

The seamy peekaboo undercurrents associated with the medical marvel are likewise nicely evoked by this photo found on one of our favorite Tumblr blogs, Sutured Infection.

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And from the blog Glamor Daze we some American footage from the 1940s that reminds us of that X-rays had much to recommend them to foot fetishists too who might have enjoyed hanging around shoe stores where X-ray scanners were kept around to aid in fitting and attract curious  consumers.

Finally, a bit of verse, also penned by Lawrence K. Russel and published by Life Magazine in 1896:

x-ray-poem

She is so tall, so slender; and her bones– Those frail phosphates, those carbonates of lime– Are well produced by cathode rays sublime; By oscillations, amperes and by ohms, Her dorsal vertebrae are no concealed By epidermis, but are well revealed.

Around her ribs, those beauteous twenty-four, Her flesh a halo makes, misty in lime, Her noseless, eyeless face looks into mine, And I but whisper, “Sweetheart, je t’adore.” Her white and gleaming teeth at me do laugh, Ah! lovely, cruel, sweet cathodagraph!

Inappropriate Playthings

We’re always collecting pictures related to medical, health, safety, and the like, but sometimes other themes emerge. Like with these three otherwise unrelated images all representing things that probably shouldn’t be given to children but apparently were.

plaything1
This painting by Dutch artist Jan van Neck depicts the great anatomist Frederick Ruysch dissecting a stillborn infant as part of an anatomy lesson. However, it’s not so much the dissected baby that caught our eye as the child (Ruysch’s son?) who’s been invited in to rubberneck. And in particular it’s that fetal skeleton the kid’s apparently been given as a toy.

plaything2

Probably not quite as dangerous as it sounds, but still alarming if nothing else for its pro-nuke propaganda, this item was produced by the A.C. Gilbert Company in 1950. It contained a geiger counter, cloud chamber, electroscope, spinthariscope, and some genuine radioisotopes just to get things popping. Gilbert was also the inventor of the classic engineering toy, the Erector Set, (which, come to think of it, is also a kind of inappropriate at least as far as that name goes.)

plaything3

And speaking of “Erectors,” the Tumblr wonderland Mostly Forbidden Zone dug up this wrong-headed attempt to — what? — make oxygen more fun to breathe? I wasn’t aware children needed additional incentive other than the threat of suffocation when it came to breathing, but even if your normal oxygen tank might be less than inviting to particularly sensitive respiratory patients, I’m not sure encouraging them to “suck on the candy tube until you make the clown’s eyes roll,” is really putting the right idea in their heads. Or maybe I just overly suspicious of clowns.

 

More Bizarre Nurse Romance Novels

More nurse romance cover art today. These gems come from among the 307 volumes in the collection of Tiny Pineapple. Check them out!

pineapple-kachina

“She had not expected to find romance on this assignment–but then, almost everything at the Indian Service Hospital had come as a surprise,” says the back cover.

With a waist cinched like that, can’t we assume her brain is probably in a perpetual state of circulatory distress easily confused for surprise?  She seems to be putting a good (if slightly manic) face on it though.  We hope her relationship with that Kachina is all she dreamed it would be.

pineapple-hootenanny

“Then there was Chad and the promise of love and fame he offered Julie, sharing his roaming, exciting life as a folksinger.”

Folksinger and inveterate womanizer maybe?  Yes, glamor waits in the wings.  Some day she’ll surely join in on stage — when he barks for a replacement for his broken string.

pineapple-iceshow

“But could the quiet, competent nurse hope to win her man when Tina whirled, glittering, out of the spotlight and into his arms?”

Ice skating rivalry?  Sounds like someone’s in for the “Tonya Harding” treatment.

pineapple-space

“Fascinating Clyde McLaren, a strong candidate for the moon shot, was brilliant and quite friendly. Or did he want more than friendship?”

Sounds like that uniform of hers is primed for a lift-off.

pineapple-movietown

This is can’t be as bad as the cover, can it?  Is that possible?