Category Archives: safety

A Few Cautionary Comics

After a long holiday weekend, your heads are probably a bit fuzzy and perhaps you’re overwhelmed with work, so it seemed safe to stick with something simple, i.e., comic books.   So today we offer four lovingly executed illustrations of things not to do in emergency situations.  Their original source  — presumably some sort of Red-Cross-issued faux comic book — remains something of a mystery, though we can thank Mostly Forbidden Zone, an eclectic trove of vintage scans from old books and magazines, for their appearance online.

comic-ablaze

 

comic-wheelchair

comic-ice

comic-collision

 

 

Achtung! Electrocution Graphics

The last posting about Soviet industrial safety posters got us thinking about some other safety graphics from dark days gone by. These handsome renderings of electrocution are from the book Electrical Safety in 132 Pictures, published in Germany just a few years before Hitler made his power grab. They were originally scanned and uploaded by roboticist and hacker Bre Pettis, and a wider assortment can be found on his Flickr set.  Enjoy and stay insulated!

electro-baby

Electrocution begins in infancy.

electro-pee

A classic case of overstimulation.

electro-xmas

Beware the tannenbaum!

electro-frauleinjpg

Such a shame to lose a lovely gartered Fräulein in this way. Who’s going to inherit that classic bakelite hair dryer?

Careful There, Comrade!

Judging by these safety posters from the site English Russia it seems Soviet-era Russia was not quite the Workers’ paradise it was cracked up to be. At least we all got some handsome graphics out of all those industrial accidents they must’ve been struggling with.

Which is your favorite way to be maimed?

russian-bracing

Translation: “Don’t leave anything without bracing.”

russian-drunk

Translation: “I was drunk at work.”

russian-hair

Translation: “Hide the hair.”

russian-picker

Translation: “Don’t open the lid of the picker before the engine stops.”

russian-transmission

Translation: “Don’t walk under the transmission arbor.”