Tag Archives: bad taste

Nurse-sploitation Thai Style

Thanks to our friend Tracy Vanity for tipping us off about this 2007 hospital horror film from Thailand: Sick Nurses.

From: AsianWack.com

Hell hath no fury like a nurse scorned in this gruesome but witty horror story from Thailand. Dr. Tar is a charming but devious surgeon who has a profitable side business supplying black market dealers with fresh human organs for transplant. Dr. Tar’s staff of seven nubile nurses help him find a steady source of victims, but one of his aides, Tahwan, is shocked to find that her sister Nook is on the doctor’s list of upcoming cases, and threatens to turn him in to the police. Dr. Tar puts Tahwan under the knife to keep her quiet, and she conveniently dies during surgery. But a few days later, Dr. Tar is receiving an award for his work saving lives, the ghost of Tahwan begins stalking the halls of the hospital, seeking violent revenge against the doctor and her fellow nurses who failed to come to her rescue.

“It Wasn’t Arizona”

In the interest of puppet safety, The Art of Bleeding brings you this musical recap of events surrounding the arrest of predatory puppeteer and evangelical kid show host, Ronald Brown.

If you haven’t been following what is surely one of the most lurid stories of the year, a bit of background from The Huffington Post:

A Florida puppeteer who entertains children at birthday parties, schools and churches, secretly wanted to rape, kill and eat them, cops said.

Ronald Brown, 57, of Largo, was arrested last week after federal agents found that he’d allegedly been chatting online with child pornography suspects about “extremely graphic discussions regarding kidnapping, sexually abusing, murdering and eating children,” according to a federal complaint obtained by the Tampa Bay Times.

The details are gruesome….. (more)

Inappropriate Playthings

We’re always collecting pictures related to medical, health, safety, and the like, but sometimes other themes emerge. Like with these three otherwise unrelated images all representing things that probably shouldn’t be given to children but apparently were.

This painting by Dutch artist Jan van Neck depicts the great anatomist Frederick Ruysch dissecting a stillborn infant as part of an anatomy lesson. However, it’s not so much the dissected baby that caught our eye as the child (Ruysch’s son?) who’s been invited in to rubberneck. And in particular it’s that fetal skeleton the kid’s apparently been given as a toy.


Probably not quite as dangerous as it sounds, but still alarming if nothing else for its pro-nuke propaganda, this item was produced by the A.C. Gilbert Company in 1950. It contained a geiger counter, cloud chamber, electroscope, spinthariscope, and some genuine radioisotopes just to get things popping. Gilbert was also the inventor of the classic engineering toy, the Erector Set, (which, come to think of it, is also a kind of inappropriate at least as far as that name goes.)


And speaking of “Erectors,” the Tumblr wonderland Mostly Forbidden Zone dug up this wrong-headed attempt to — what? — make oxygen more fun to breathe? I wasn’t aware children needed additional incentive other than the threat of suffocation when it came to breathing, but even if your normal oxygen tank might be less than inviting to particularly sensitive respiratory patients, I’m not sure encouraging them to “suck on the candy tube until you make the clown’s eyes roll,” is really putting the right idea in their heads. Or maybe I just overly suspicious of clowns.


When You Care Enough to Give Testicles

And speaking of von Hagens yesterday, we came upon this…..


“Why, yes, that is a plastinated bull testicle hanging from my neck!”

It’s not often enough you are able to utter that sentence, is it? But if you and your credit card can take a moment to swing by world-famous Gunther von “The Plastinator” Hagens’ online giftshop, your chances of accepting plastinated bull testicle compliments would be greatly increased.  If you buy one, of course.

Or if the bull testicle piece is a bit minimalist for you, perhaps these more ornate pig slice earrings would be to your liking? Not quite sure what part of the pig they are, but they don’t look much like bacon.


Still not flamboyant enough?  Not to worry!  There are countless other choices representing varying degrees baroque grotesquery in Gunther’s Consumerworld pleasure palace.

Unfortunately, the plastinated cross-sectional “Sex Act” piece below is sold.  It’s a shame too because it would have made quite a striking coffee table.


Cumming Soon! New AoB Video!


So, we’ve missed several days of blogging thanks to production on a soon-to-be-uploaded Art of Bleeding video. What’s it about, you say? Well, the above image is intended as a hint.

No, it’s not a porn video, but like the good Dr. von Hagens, we know how to get your attention. Look for the new AoB Bodyworlds-inspired video on this site sometime later next month.

And while we’re on the topic of von Hagen’s plastinated “Reverse Cowgirl”…

In response to a 2009 controversy over this particular exhibit, a sulky von Hagens told the media he would saw the bodies off at the waists, presenting the conjoined male/female organs  in more clinical isolation. He is depicted here “dispelling controversy” (?) by waving a prop saw around the couple. Unclear whether he ever actually fulfilled this threat.

Ever the showman, that von Hagens!  Hat’s off!

Gunther Saws them up

Cadavers Gone Wild

The last post on medical students of the good old days and their good old gallows humor got me poking around to document some of those semi-mythic stories we’ve all heard about ghoulish stunts with anatomy lab cadavers.

The most widely circulated recent case is that presented in this video and mentioned on Boing Boing in October 2010.   Have a look and decide for yourself whether you think it’s genuine as the verdict is definitely out on this one.

Reaching back a little further, we find Mr. Parallel’s delightful horde of old newspaper clippings, where one can read of medical students propping up cadavers as scarecrows, heaving severed heads out windows, staking them on picket fences,  nailing loose hands to telephone poles, and hanging dissected bodies in effigy.  Good times!



Vintage Dissection Lab Photos


Nowadays before medical students begin their cadaver dissections, they are invited to participate in high-minded ceremonies honoring those whose bodies are soon to be opened, but in the wild and wooly days before the mid-twentieth century, med students lightened this grisly rite of passage with humor,  painting macabre slogans on their dissection tables, and sometimes posing the bodies in less-than-reverent situations.

A good starting point for exploring such things is the 2009 publication Dissection: Photographs of a rite of passage in American medicine 1880-1930, by John Harley Warner and James Edmonson, published by Blast Books.

The  general phenomenon of anatomy lab photography is thus described by the book’s publisher:

In the 19th and early 20th century, a culture of secrecy surrounded human dissection in medical education. Students could be expelled for divulging the source or the identities of “subjects,” while anatomy professors, demonstrators, and janitors were to guard the dissection room’s secrets-which makes it all the more striking how often medical students documented and commemorated this rite of passage.  At the same time that student dissectors were admonished to shield the secrets of the dissecting room, they frequently invited in the eye of the camera to pose with “their” cadavers. For nearly the next half century, through the 1920s, the dissection photo would become one of the most archetypal and ubiquitous forms of medical student portraiture before 1930, yet it vanished almost completely after 1950.

These photographs were made in a surprising variety of forms: class portraits, cartes de visite and postcards, and staged dark humor scenes.  Complete with illuminating essays by two experts on the subject, Dissection features 138 extraordinary, rare historic photographs of the unseen world of the rite of passage into the mysteries of medicine.

Most of the pictures posted here — originally from the Dittrick Medical History Center — are from the afore mentioned book.  These photos and more info can be found on Science FridayDiscover Magazine, Morbid Anatomy, American Medical News.   The last few and more can be found in the online collections of The Burns Archive.

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