Tag Archives: fashion

“Skinned Alive” by Jemma McLean

Again with our fascination for anatomical fetish fashions…

This link comes from the ever-tantalizing StreetAnatomy blog, describing the work:

This beautiful collection by Jemma Marie McLean, called Skinned Alive the Anatomical Structure is inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci’s anatomical drawings.

Jemma founded Purdy Corsetry after being disappointed by the quality and selection of what she found in New Zealand.  She knew with her wealth of experience in sewing and degree in Fashion design from Massey University that she could make the best corsets possible.

Purdy Corsetry is located in Central Wellington, New Zealand.  View all her latest work via Facebook!

T-shirts and Rumors of T-shirts

2006

Our friend Bill from Y-Que Trading Post, purveyor of LA’s finest satirical and pleasingly moronic T-shirts  (including ART OF BLEEDING T-SHIRTS) just dug up this picture he shot at our 2006 “Halloween Highway” show.  He’s talking about putting on a T-shirt and making it available at our upcoming 2011 Halloween Highway 2 show.  Just the gift for mom and dad this Christmas!

ekay_2149_34953377ekay_2149_34967937

More Anatomical Textile Art

textile1

 

textile2

A couple more exciting interesting images have been circulating through the Tumblr universe.

The first a bustier trotted out at this summer at “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk,” at the Montreal’s Musée des Beaux-Arts.

The knitted autopsy is the work of  Canadian multimedia artist Cadace Couse and appeared recently on the always-entertaining Street Anatomy.

 

More Vintage X-Ray Fetishism

http://youtu.be/xLg_3XyXAyc

We can’t just get enough of those Naughty, Naughty Roentgen Rays. The above commercial, from 1930s Germany, nicely illustrates the fears (and titillation) surrounding Dr. Roentgen’s invention, then goes on to assure the modern woman that rumors of “Roentgetn glasses,” been true, she would be well served by the elegance of contemporary Felina lingerie.

And these fears were real enough to sustain a brief market in anti-voyeueristic dress manufacture as evidenced by this ad from 1896 for “the perfect dress interlining.”

perfect_dress

The seamy peekaboo undercurrents associated with the medical marvel are likewise nicely evoked by this photo found on one of our favorite Tumblr blogs, Sutured Infection.

tumblr_lq915po45b1qzn0kbo1_500

And from the blog Glamor Daze we some American footage from the 1940s that reminds us of that X-rays had much to recommend them to foot fetishists too who might have enjoyed hanging around shoe stores where X-ray scanners were kept around to aid in fitting and attract curious  consumers.

Finally, a bit of verse, also penned by Lawrence K. Russel and published by Life Magazine in 1896:

x-ray-poem

She is so tall, so slender; and her bones– Those frail phosphates, those carbonates of lime– Are well produced by cathode rays sublime; By oscillations, amperes and by ohms, Her dorsal vertebrae are no concealed By epidermis, but are well revealed.

Around her ribs, those beauteous twenty-four, Her flesh a halo makes, misty in lime, Her noseless, eyeless face looks into mine, And I but whisper, “Sweetheart, je t’adore.” Her white and gleaming teeth at me do laugh, Ah! lovely, cruel, sweet cathodagraph!

The Anatomical Art of Fernando Vicente

vicente3

vicente4

vicente1

vicente2

Spanish illustrator and artist Fernando Vicente merges photography and painting in his illustrations for magazines, books, CDs, and film posters, but may be most well known in this country for his anatomically themed “Vanitas” and “Anatomias” painting series — the former dissecting the fashion world with a rather literal touch and the latter taking a similarly literal approach to the machine/body analogy.

When You Care Enough to Give Testicles

And speaking of von Hagens yesterday, we came upon this…..

plastinate-testicle

“Why, yes, that is a plastinated bull testicle hanging from my neck!”

It’s not often enough you are able to utter that sentence, is it? But if you and your credit card can take a moment to swing by world-famous Gunther von “The Plastinator” Hagens’ online giftshop, your chances of accepting plastinated bull testicle compliments would be greatly increased.  If you buy one, of course.

Or if the bull testicle piece is a bit minimalist for you, perhaps these more ornate pig slice earrings would be to your liking? Not quite sure what part of the pig they are, but they don’t look much like bacon.

plastinate-pig

Still not flamboyant enough?  Not to worry!  There are countless other choices representing varying degrees baroque grotesquery in Gunther’s Consumerworld pleasure palace.

Unfortunately, the plastinated cross-sectional “Sex Act” piece below is sold.  It’s a shame too because it would have made quite a striking coffee table.

plastinate-sex

Surgical Couture 2: Basic Black

vint-alexis-carrel

After our last post about dramatic surgical styles, it’s hard not to think of Alexis Carrel, the man who really put the “theater” in “operating theater.” As divine as vintage white surgical gowns might be, the diabolical black shrouds preferred by Dr. Carrel surely have them beat.

Carrel, a French surgeon and Nobel Prize winner working in America in the 1920s and 1930s, believed that black aided the mental focus of his surgical team as well as visually highlighting any dust that might appear in the operating room. He therefore not only insisted his team dress head to toe in black, but even had the walls painted that color. The ominous aura did not go unnoticed by journalists covering Carrel’s surgical experiments, especially since that work involved keeping human organs alive outside the body — heady s stuff for an era fascinated with the mad scientists of pulp novels and early horror movies.

Appearing on the cover of Time Magazine only two months after the release of The Bride of Frankenstein, Carrel was treated both as a sinister curiosity and beloved celebrity, the latter in no small part due to his friendship with aviator Charles Lindbergh, who not only who assisted Carrel with the engineering of a perfusion pump necessary for the doctor’s transplant experiments but also shared some of Carrel’s more esoteric perspectives on shaping humanity’s future. These included the possibility of physical immortality and Carrel’s most unfortunate legacy — advocacy of eugenics.

More on that curious friendship can be found in David M. Friedman’s The Immortalists: Charles Lindbergh, Dr. Alexis Carrel, and Their Daring Quest to Live Forever, the source of the picture above (via Depressed Metabolism.

Surgical Couture: Vintage White

vintsurge1

V0030945 Wotton Lodge, Gloucester: operating theatre and staff.

vintsurge3

Sure, contemporary blue or green surgical wear may be easier on the eye, but only the white wardrobe of yesteryear really moves us. So it was a great delight to discover the Flickr set of “Knuckles 45,” who obviously shares our appreciation for antique surgical styles. Savor for a moment these depictions of surgeons dressed the way God intended — in a color that evokes not only professional gravitas but the very power of angels, heaven, death and all things unseen.  And don’t even get us started on those hoods!